Child Safety

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What Your Children Should Know
Preschoolers Ages 3-5

Call for help.

Children as young as three should be taught how to contact the local emergency number in an emergency. Practice with a toy phone, teaching your preschooler how to dial the appropriate emergency service. Yokosuka Base is 911, off base is 119.

Children this age also should be able to dial their own home phone numbers. With incoming calls, they should know never to say that an adult is not present, and never to give personal information over the phone.

Recite address and phone number.

In an emergency, children also should be able to clearly state their name, address, phone number, and if possible, provide a brief description of the situation. Set up pretend emergencies and let your child practice responding.

Never play with fire.

Because fire is fascinating to small children, they need to be taught how dangerous it is. Tell little ones how painful it would be to be burned, and stress never to play with matches or lighters.

Buckle up!

Make sure children understand why and how they should be properly restrained while in the car. They should NEVER take their restraint off while the car is in motion.

Use safety equipment.

Life jackets, bike helmets, roller-blading safety gear and other safety equipment for outdoor activities can help kids reduce their risk of injury when they’re out having fun. Make the rules regarding their use simple: No matter how short the bike ride, the helmet goes on; no matter how little time you’ll be in the boat, the life jacket must be worn, and so on.

Check First!

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children advises parents to establish the “Check First” rule with their children. David Shapiro, director of marketing and development, summarizes the rule as follows:

“Before you go anywhere with anyone, even someone you know, Check First with an adult in whose care you are entrusted (parents, teacher, daycare provider, baby-sitter, etc.). Ask if it is okay, tell them who you will be going with, where you are going, how you are getting there, and when you will return.”
 

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