Heat Stress

Current Heat Stress Condition (NAVSTA Norfolk Area)

Full Heat Stress Chart and Flag Colors

Heat Index and Physical Exercise

Heat Stress Presentation

Working Outdoors- OSHA Fact Sheet 

Heat Related Illness
This site is very informative on:

  • Preventing heat related illnesses
  • Heat related terms
  • Stages of heat related illnesses
  • General care for heat emergencies


OSHA Heat Stress Quick Card

When the body is unable to cool itself by sweating, several heat-induced illnesses such as heat stress or heat exhaustion and the more severe heat stroke can occur, and can result in death. This quick reference card gives a good summary of symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke, preventative measures for heat stress, etc.

OSHA-NIOSH INFOSHEET:  Protecting Workers rrom Heat Stress

Being uncomfortable is not the major problem with working in high temperatures and humidities. Workers who are suddenly exposed to working in a hot environment face additional and generally avoidable hazards to their safety and health. The employer should provide detailed instructions on preventive measures and adequate protection necessary to prevent heat stress.

Heat Stress SOP
Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth VA.

Guidelines for Working in Hot Environments- In this geographical area (the Norfolk, Virginia, or Hampton Roads, area) during the summer, temperatures and relative humidity are typically high. These conditions can result in personnel being uncomfortable, and in some instances may present a health risk to personnel. Implementing a heat stress reduction program at local facilities will aid in the prevention of "heat" related illnesses to otherwise "healthy" individuals.

Beating the Heat
From OSHA Job Safety and Health Quarterly

Heat-related illnesses are vastly under recognized and underreported. Are you taking effective measures to help employees beat the heat? Consider the 36-year-old man who stopped dismantling a car at a Tilton, Ill., auto salvage shop last summer, complaining he felt overheated. His coworkers summoned emergency help, but he died less than an hour later. Or the 58-year-old restaurant worker in Aurora, Ohio, who collapsed after cleaning a patio area. Despite emergency worker's efforts to revive him, he was pronounced dead in the hospital emergency room with a core body temperature of 107 degrees. Or the highly publicized case of 27-year-old Minnesota Vikings tackle Korey Stringer, who collapsed last July after morning practice during the second day of training camp and later died of heatstroke.

 

 

 

 

 

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