Family Emergency Plan

Post the plan where everyone will see it - on the refrigerator or bulletin board.

Practice and maintain your plan. Quiz your kids every six months or so.

Conduct fire and emergency evacuations drills.

Take First Aid, CPR and disaster preparedness classes.

Discuss the types of hazards that could affect your family, including fire, weather, power outages and personal injuries.

Post emergency telephone numbers by your phones and make sure your children know how and when to call 911. Teach children how and when to call the base emergency numbers.

Make a list of where family members spend time, eg. school, work, babysitter, neighbor, etc. Include the phone number and where the family member should go from there in case of an emergency.

Make ID cards for each family member listing name, address, phone number, next of kin, and any medical conditions.

Instruct household members to turn on the radio for emergency information.

Show each family member how and when to turn off the water, gas, and electricity at the main switches.

Get training from the fire department for each family member on how to use the fire extinguisher (ABC type), and show them where it's kept. Test and recharge your fire extinguisher/s according to manufacturer's instructions.

Maintain good fire safety practices in your home.

  • Teach family members to stay low to the ground when escaping from a fire.
  • Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire, feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
  • Install smoke detectors. Clean and test smoke detectors once a month. Change batteries at least twice a year.
  • Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken household members in case of fire.
  • Check electrical outlets. Do not overload outlets. Purchase a fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type).
  • Have a collapsible ladder on each upper floor of your house.
  • Consider installing home sprinklers.

Know your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind. Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each hurricane hazard.

Determine escape routes from your home.

  • Develop an escape plan by drawing a floor plan of your residence. Using a black or blue pen, show the location of doors, windows, stairways, and large furniture. Indicate the location of emergency supplies (Disaster Supplies Kit), fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, collapsible ladders, first aid kits, and utility shutoff points.
  • Use a colored pen to draw a broken line charting at least two escape routes from each room. Mark a place outside of the home where household members should meet in case of fire.

Pick two places to meet. Right outside your home in case of a sudden emergency, like a fire and outside your neighborhood in case you cannot return home. Everyone must know the address and phone number.

Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact, someone well outside of the affected zone. Everyone must know your contact's phone number. Teach children how to make long distance telephone calls.

Plan how you will help elderly or disabled persons, if necessary.

  • Discuss your needs with family members, neighbors, and co-workers.
  • Make sure those around you know how to operate any necessary equipment.
  • Have a list with the types and models of any equipment or devices you need.
  • Know more than one location of a medical facility that provides the services you need.
  • Add any necessary supplies such a wheelchair batteries, catheters, oxygen, medication, food for service animals, or other special supplies to your emergency kit.
  • Do not assume that you or your loved one has been factored into an evacuation plan.
  • Make the necessary preparations and know what needs to happen during an emergency.
  • If you are physically disabled, study the evacuation plan of any building from which you might evacuate. If necessary, know if and where an Evacuation Chair (EVAC+CHAIR) is located, and make sure someone knows how to operate it.
  • Prepare any instructions you need to give rescuers or others who may be around you. Use concise verbal directions, or carry written instructions with you at all times.
  • After a declared emergency, register your needs with the Navy through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) at https://www.navyfamily.navy.mil or call 1-877-414-5358 or 1-866-297-1971 (TDD).
     

Make a plan now for what to do with your pets if you need to evacuate. Animals are not allowed inside emergency shelters because of health regulations.

Bring pets inside immediately. Many times pets run away when they sense danger. Never leave them tied up outside.

  • If you are told to evacuate and you can bring your pets:
    • Take enough supplies and food for at least three days.
    • Make sure the carrier is secure.
    • Be responsible for your pets by cleaning up after them and making sure they are not causing problems.
    • Understand that many shelters do not allow pets. You may have to board your pet or place it in a shelter prepared for evacuated pets.
  • If you are told to evacuate and are ordered NOT to bring your pets:
    • Bring your pet inside. Never leave your pet outside during an emergency.
    • Leave plenty of food and water.
    • Take the toilet seat off and brace the bathroom door so they can drink.
    • Place a notice on your door that your pet is inside. Include your name, phone number, and the name and phone number of your veterinarian.

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